Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski

unnamed-5

 

Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at the Women’s Art Library.

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW
Event Date: Thursday 1st March 2018
Time: 3pm – 4.30pm

Bio: Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski

Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski Minneapolis based, London-born, Nigerian mixed-media artist/designer, archivist and organiser. Her work and research explores the relationship between feminist, queer, decolonizing theories/spaces and organizational, curatorial, artistic (self) archiving practices.

Sowinski is currently part of the Archival Education Research Initiative (AERI) Emerging Archival Scholars Program (EASP). Between 2014-16 she was an artist/archivist in residence at the Women’s Art Library, Goldsmiths with art, archival research group X Marks the Spot. Sowinski is currently collaborating with artist/archivist Rita Keegan and the Women of Colour Index Artist Files Collection.  She is in the process of developing a collaborative digitisation project to archive the papers of Nigerian Afrobeat musician, Fela Anikulapo Kuti (1938-1997).  She is a committee member for the GLC Story Oral History Project and a specialist volunteer for the Equiano Centre, UCL.

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome

Workshop reading text:

‘WHAT IS PEOPLE’S REACTION TO YOUR WORK?
Not many people stop too much. A lot of people just pass over them. Black and white. I would like people to look at them a bit more carefully and think about them.

There’s a lot of discussion about art, but photography’s such a young a medium. There’s a big block even though there’s stuff coming out now. You need to actually compile bibliographies and stuff so that a dialogue can happen’. Ingrid Pollard talks to Molly Shinhat. Polareyes – A journal about Black Women working in photography, Issue No.1 1987.
Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-with-ego-ahaiwe-sowinski-tickets-43324042377
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/202303733686021/
FB: WOCI Reading group
Twitter: @WOCIReading

Advertisements

Women of Colour Index Reading Group looking at artist Georgina Grant at CASS

unnamed-4

*Closed event (only open to student and staff at CASS).
Event Date: Monday 26th February 2018
Time: 4pm – 6pm

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome

Workshop reading text:

‘The self portraits within this exhibition relate my feelings and emotions at different periods of my life. Although painted at college they exist separately from other work I did at that time. They represent a release of emotion, they were more personal than my work, with them I could relax and look at myself.

My mixed parentage is an underlying force in some of my paintings, but mainly these are about being a Blackowomen within an environment where all the ‘models’ – students, tutors and ‘Old Masters’ are white.

I feel that Blackwoman artists are making statements from all different angles, personal and otherwise, ultimately reaching points of discovery to do with Black identity and womens identity, but mainly they do not see these two identities as separate’.

Georgina Grant, May 1988. 
FB: WOCI Reading group
Twitter: @WOCIReading

The ‘R’ Words – Racism and Reparations: Women of Colour speaking out loud in a culture of silencing and co-option   

ahmed

Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event with Decolonising Our Minds Society

Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Halimo Hussain, Carol John, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at SOAS.

Full address: Room: 116, Russell Square Campus, SOAS University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG
Event Date: Wednesday 17th January 2018
Time: 5pm – 7pm

Decolonising Our Minds Society Bio
London based society committed to deconstructing the legacies of colonialism responsible for structural and epistemic violence.

Carol John – works in Student Advice and Wellbeing and is the UCU rep for Equality and Diversity. She is also involved in community organising outside of the university and Halimo Hussein – The Student Union Co-President (Equality and Liberation).  Halimo is one of the original members of the Decolonising Our Minds Society but also involved in organising outside of the university. She currently sits on the Decolonising SOAS working group.

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome

 

Workshop reading text:

‘The smile of diversity is a fantasy fold. Diversity is often imagined as a form of repair a way of mending or fixing histories of being broken. Indeed, diversity enters institutional discourse as a language of reparation; as a way of imagining that those who are divided can work together; as a way of assuming that “to get along” is to right a wrong. Not to be excluded becomes not simply an account of the present (an account of becoming included) but also a way of relating to the past. Racism is framed as a memory of what is no longer, a memory if it was kept alive would just leave us exhausted. Fanon once commented very wisely how slavery had become “that unpleasant memory” ([1952] 1986: 115). It is almost as if it would be impolite to bring it up. In the book Life in the United Kingdom, on which British citizenship tests are based, there is one reference to slavery and that is to abolitionism (Home Office 2005: 13). The nation is remembered as the liberator of slaves, not as the perpetrator of slavery’.

On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life by Sara Ahmed

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-r-words-racism-and-reparations-women-of-colour-speaking-out-loud-in-a-culture-of-silencing-and-tickets-42050900375

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/138579003463729/

W: https://wocireadinggroup.wordpress.com
FB: WOCI Reading group
Twitter: @WOCIReading

Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event with Alia Pathan

unnamed-13

Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Alia Pathan, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at ASC Gallery exhibiting Alia Pathan’s solo show ‘Fire Rooster’.

Full address: ASC, Gallery, The Chaplin Centre, Taplow House, Thurlow St, London SE17 2DG
Event Date: Monday 18th December 2017
Time: 5pm – 7pm

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome

 

Workshop reading text:

“AP As you walk into the show there’s 3 sound pieces from the White Tiger Project, a research project I started the beginning of this year, looking at second and third generation descendants of East African Indian indentured labourers, that came from India to East Africa which is the same as my heritage. I will at some point open that out to people who left East Africa at the same time (while it was under British colonial rule) and moved to other countries within Africa. But for the moment this archive is focusing on descendants who live in England because for these people they are often 80 – 100 years removed from their ethnic heritage. And the stories are focused on what their lives are like whether they can remember anything or their histories are cut off from them. For them it’s about creating a sense of home and identity for themselves. For example one of the participants says when people ask her where she is from she can’t answer truthfully about her provenance. There seems to be an insistence on provenance especially within contemporary art and in political discussions today…. And if you’re a diaspora… it feels untrue to call one place your home. That’s why this archive opens the show, and instead of a press release – their stories create my context when there isn’t already a context written for me”

Katharine Fry interview with Alia Pathan, Fire Rooster PV, ASC Gallery 17 November 2017, Press Release

Photo credit to Eleni Parousi

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-event-with-alia-pathan-tickets-41119511566

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/198567044023939/

W: https://wocireadinggroup.wordpress.com
FB: WOCI Reading group
Twitter: @WOCIReading

 

Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Rita Keegan

unnamed-6

Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group Special Collections & Archives, The Library with Rita Kegan, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Althea Greenan, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Special Collections, Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW

Event Date: Wednesday 1st November 2017
Time: 5.00pm – 7.00pm

WOCI Reading Group started in October 2016 by Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman. Once a month WOCI Reading Group workshops are organised at Women’s Art Library to read text and look at art work by women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group aims to improve visibility of women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group welcomes all, people from all backgrounds, genders, religions and races. During workshop critical discussions are encouraged.

Below workshop reading text. All reading text are materials from Women of Colour Index Archive collated by Rita Keegan.

Workshop reading text:

‘We all felt strongly about documentation. Ultimately the only thing that is left is documentation and that was a perfect way do it. We felt like that in terms of exhibitions and in terms of any kind of research we were doing that, it was so easy to get erased from history. You know, we’d seen it with the feminists; we’d seen it with so many other things. So the, understanding of how important documentation was key.

Having the place in the Slide Library, where I could sort of invent this Index and it was always available for other people to see, for me it was quiet important that it’s not someone’s private collection, that it is available.’ Rita Keegan – Reflecting with Rita Keegan on 04 September 2015, Interviewed and transcribed by Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski, Human Endeavour, X Marks The Spot

Image above from ‘Human Endeavour’ by X Marks the Spot.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-event-with-rita-keegan-tickets-39217318054

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/750756105125128/?acontext=%7B%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22page%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22page_upcoming_events_card%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A[]%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D
FB: WOCI Reading group
Twitter: @WOCIReading

Twilight City by Black Audio Film Collective – WOCI Reading Group at South London Gallery

Wed 6 Sep, 6pm, Clore Studio, Free

6.30 pm – 8.00pm

 

1. Policing the Crisis p. 31 -32, Stuart Hall, 1978

“Blacks become the bearers, the signifier, of the crisis of British society in the 70s: racism is its ‘final solution’…This is not a crisis of race. But race punctuates and periodizes the crisis. Race is the lens through which people come to perceive that a crisis is developing. It is the framework through which the crisis is experienced. It is the means by which the crisis is to be revolved – ‘send it away’. (Hall, 1978: 31-2)

2. Representing Black Britain: Black and Asian images on Television by Sarita Malik

3. The Workshop Years: Black British Film and Video after 1981 at the Hammer Museum

“Independent black British filmmaking saw an increased urgency and viability in the aftermath of South London’s Brixton Rising in 1981. In many respects this event—part of a series of responses to police brutality, corruption, and racist policies aimed at undermining the rights of Britain’s black population—was the first of its kind to unfold within the context of the BBC’s nightly news.1 At an early moment in British television history, over the course of three days in April 1981, audiences were routinely exposed to images of dissenting blackness through the mediating lens of mainstream journalism; these images became inextricably linked to a series of representational codes that further underscored aspects of British society that had inherited and internalized systematic racial inequities. The depiction of black identity occasioned by the Brixton Rising was one of disorder, lawlessness, and rage—characterizations that continued in the months that followed with subsequent confrontations between protestors and police taking place in Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, and other cities.2”

Part 2

10 minute audio clip of an interview with Gail Lewis discussing activism in London during 70s and 80s and the faultlines that have threatened solidarities, as well as this excerpt from Gail’s Guardian article:

“Gail Lewis: Infighting is inclusion”
Guardian Article, March 2014. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/mar/07/international-womens-day-defence-feminist-dissent-argued-priorities

South London Gallery press release and booking:

http://southlondongallery.org/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-twilight-city/?utm_source=MASTER+-+South+London+Gallery+Mailing+List&utm_campaign=ee6b7550ce-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_06_03&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_5d7886dd9e-ee6b7550ce-

Facebook Event:

https://www.facebook.com/events/127293654576462/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%223%22%2C%22ref_newsfeed_story_type%22%3A%22regular%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%22117%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D

 

WOMEN OF COLOUR INDEX READING GROUP PRESENTS:

Please join us at The Showroom tomorrow night for –

COOL ATMOSPHERES: Performing Inner Songs featuring Priya Srinivasan, Uthra Vijay and Andrea Campaneau. Following on from the performance, WOCI will be in conversation with the performers and Melissa Blanco.

Venue: The Showroom Gallery, 63 Penfold Street, NW8 http://www.theshowroom.org/visit
Tuesday, 30 May, 6-7pm
Please RSVP to Melissa.Blanco@rhul.ac.uk

This interdisciplinary performance uses poetry, dance, music and visual imagery to look at the inner landscapes of disparate women’s journeys through their imaginative connections across time and place to understand migration from the atmospheres of emotion. Pairing Andal the 9th century female poet from South India with recovered and Fragmented images and stories of exile past and present from Australia, Sudan and Romania, the piece invites audiences to rethink feminist voices from non-western contexts through the impact of their intersections. The performance invokes intimacy, playing with light, sound, and movement. Dancer/scholar Priya Srinivasan (Australia) joins singer Uthra Vijay (India/Australia) and visual artist Andrea Campaneau (Romania) for a unique collaboration of classical carnatic music, contemporary Indian dance theatre and the convergence of histories, lyricism, affect, and resonance. The performance will be followed by a discussion with audiences and local communities.

Supported by Royal Holloway University (HARC/HARI Fund led by Dr. Melissa Blanco Borelli and part of the Aesthetics of Cool Series), Royal Central School of Drama (Kate Elswit) and the Women of Colour Reading Index (WOCI) group with Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman (Goldsmith’s College)

Bios
Uthra Vijay is the Artistic Director of Keerthana School of Music in Melbourne that she founded in 2003. She is a versatile artist, composer and educator, who is equally comfortable working in the classical realm or experimenting with non-classical forms of music including popular music and contemporary forms. She has an extensive background in Indian classical music, winning several awards and performing in a range of venues in India and Australia. Uthra is an accomplished Classical Indian Music Vocalist having learned from several distinguished gurus and was exposed to different musical styles culminating in her training under the auspices of S.P. Ramh in the late legendary violinist Lalgudi Jayaram’s School of Music. She has brought her extensive solo performance experience in South India from The Rasika Ranjani Sabha, Karaikudi Kamban Vizha, Ramakrishna Mutt, and elsewhere to Melbourne and has presented concert length performances. She has also collaborated and performed in contemporary performances at the Treasury Building for Mapping Melbourne Festival, Jaipur Literary Festival in Melbourne (Fed Square), Immigration Museum for the Triennial International Asian Festival AsiaTOPA which included intercultural experimentation with Iranian singer Tabassom Ostad. Her compositional work includes setting classical and contemporary music for vocalists and dancers alike, including soundscapes for experimental artists.

Dr. Priya Srinivasan is a dancer, choreographer and scholar whose research and performance is framed by postmodern sensibilities while grounded in feminist Indian classical performance practices. Her work brings together live bodily performance with visual art, interactive multimedia and digital technology to think about archives of the body, migration, and female labor from the perspective of art. Her work has been presented in diverse settings in many theatre houses, galleries, universities, museums, and in public spaces such as the Rockbund Art Museum in Shanghai (China), The Korzo Theatre in The Hague (Netherlands), Folkwang Performing Arts Center in Essen (Germany), The Allard Pierson Museum in Amsterdam (Netherlands), typografia galleria in Bucharest (Romania), Krishna Gana Sabha in Chennai (India), Unknown Theatre in California, in international festivals such as AsiaTOPA and Jaipur Literary Festival in Melbourne, Australia, and site specific works at the Irvine Civic Center and Bill Barber Park, in Los Angeles (USA), Treasury Building and The Immigration Museum in Melbourne Australia. She will be performing in London, Amsterdam, Berlin, and Hamburg collaborating with European musicians, visual artists, and choreographers on gendered migration projects in May-June 2017. She has presented her performance and academic work at Harvard University (USA), Stanford University (USA), Oxford University (UK) and several other spaces in Switzerland, Sweden, UK, and Austria. She has a PhD in Performance Studies from Northwestern University and has created the form of “talking dances” based on her award winning book “Sweating Saris Indian Dance as Transnational Labor.” Priya has created a range of site specific pieces that focus on migration and loss, and make visible minority women’s histories offering an alternate feminist aesthetic.

Andrea Campeanu is a Romanian freelance photojournalist based in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. She hold a MA in Media and Visual Anthropology from Free University in Berlin. She frequently contributed to Reuters, AFP, the United Nations and international NGOs. Her work has appeared among others in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Time, Le Monde, Paris Match, The Guardian, Newsweek and National Geographic Romania. Her work often focuses on documenting issues related to displacement and the effects of conflict. She has covered the ramifications of war in South Sudan and Central African Republic. She also frequently cover arts,
fashion and sports culture in marginalized countries or communities. She lived and worked in Sudan, South Sudan, Madagascar and Lebanon. She also worked in Spain, Morocco, Central African Republic, Greece, Turkey.