Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event 8

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Join us for the 7th Women of Colour Index Reading Group Special Collections & Archives, The Library with Michelle Williams Gamaker, Althea Greenan, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Special Collections, Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW

Event Date: Monday 24th April 2017
Time: 10.30am – 1.00pm

WOCI Reading Group started in October 2016 by Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman. Once a month WOCI Reading Group workshops are organised at Women’s Art Library to read text and look at art work by women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group aims to improve visibility of women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group welcomes all, people from all backgrounds, genders, religions and races. During workshop critical discussions are encouraged.

Below workshop reading text. All reading text are materials from Women of Colour Index Archive collated by Rita Keegan. To clarify, artists mentioned in workshop reading text, due to busy work schedule will usually not be able to attend reading group.

Workshop reading text:

Jagjit Chuhan, born in India, 1955. Studied at Slade School of Fine Art, University College, London, 1973 – 7

Jagjit Chuhan was one of the artist included in the In Focus series of exhibitions held at the Horizon Gallery, London in response to a perceived omission in the Hayward Gallery exhibition The Other Story of certain aspects of Asian artist work in Britain. Whilst The Other Story went some way towards addressing the issue of the absence of non-European artists from the history of modern art, its term of reference, and hence its choice of artists, were determined by curatorial assumptions about the primacy of modernism within twentieth century art.

Chuhan’s work however is centred on a re-interpretation of the complexities and philosophical concerns of the artist’s own cultural traditions. It belongs therefore within an art practice which is a positive alternative to either a more direct engagement with modernism or the adoptions of an oppositional rhetoric. At the same time as being rooted in Indian aesthetics, Chuhan’s work has evolved from a continuing appreciation of Western art. It as a synthesis characteristics of the cultural reciprocity that is becoming central to the reshaping of British culture.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-event-8-tickets-33680752036

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1790615527934701/

 

Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event 7

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Join us for the 7th Women of Colour Index Reading Group Special Collections & Archives, The Library with Althea Greenan, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Special Collections, Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW

Event Date: Monday 13th March 2017
Time: 10.30am – 1.00pm

WOCI Reading Group started in October 2016 by Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman. Once a month WOCI Reading Group workshops are organised at Women’s Art Library to read text and look at art work by women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group aims to create and improve visibility of women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group welcomes all, people from all backgrounds, genders, religions and races. During workshop critical discussions are encouraged.

Below workshop reading text, all reading texts are materials from Women of Colour Archive collated by Rita Keegan. To clarify, artists mentioned in workshop reading text, due to busy work schedule will usually not be able to attend reading group.

Workshop reading text:

the image employed,
the use of narrative in Black art

Cornerhouse
70 Oxford Street Manchester
13 June – 18 July 1987
Artists: Allan de Souza, Amanda Holiday, Chila Kumari Burman, Claudette Johnson, Donald G Rodney, Eddie Chambers, Jennifer Comrie, Keith Piper, Marlene Smith, Mathison/ George, Mowbray Odonkor, Simone Alexander, Sonia Boyce, Sutapa Biswas, Tam Joseph, Zarina Bhimji

Selected by Keith Piper and Marlene Smith

It is at long last widely recognised that Black artists have been living and working in this country since the 1930’s. Over the ensuing decades we have witnessed a hard fought for but sustained increase in the visibility of individual and collective Black presences within the hallowed chambers of arts mainstream. From the inception of the Caribbean Artist Movement in 1966, to the activities of the BLK Art Group in the early 1980’s, this visibility was to a large extent due to initiatives undertaken by organised and assertive collectives of Black artists. In more recent years however, the majority of ‘high profile’ exhibitions of work by Black artists have materialised through a reversing of this type of initiative. Corner house’s invitation to Marlene Smith and myself to select an exhibition of work by Black artists must be seen as yet another manifestation of this trend.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-event-7-tickets-32505329315
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Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event 6

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Join us for the 6th Women of Colour Index Reading Group Special Collections & Archives, The Library with Althea Greenan, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Special Collections, Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW

Event Date: Monday 20th February 2017
Time: 10.30am – 1.00pm

WOCI Reading Group started in October 2016 by Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rahana Zaman. Once a month WOCI Reading Group workshops are organised at Women’s Art Library to read text and look at art work by women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group aims to create and improve visibility of women of colour artists. WOCI Reading Group welcomes all, people from all backgrounds, genders, religions and races. During workshop critical discussions are encouraged.

Below workshop reading text, all reading texts are materials from Women of Colour Archive collated by Rita Keegan. To clarify Sonia Boyce will not be at the reading group, text references Sonia Boyce’s solo exhibition at Rochdale Art Gallery in 1987.

Workshop reading text:

Workshops reading text:

Artist: Sonia Boyce

ROCHDALE ART GALLERY

SONIA BOYCE

4th July – 1st August 1987

Preview – Friday 3rd July 7.30pm – All welcome

Sonia Boyce is one of many Blackwomen artists who are making an important intervention into contemporary art practice.
Sonia’s work has recently been seen in many group exhibitions including ‘Blackskin/ Bluecoat’ (Bluecoat Gallery, Liverpool, 1985). ‘The Thin Black Line’ (ICA, London, 1985) and ‘From Two Worlds’ (Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, 1986). This is Sonia’s second one-person exhibition. She has taught at St Martin’s School of Art, Leeds University and the Triangle, Birmingham and for the past year has worked at the Docklands Community Poster Project in London.

The exhibition was organised by the AIR Gallery, London and includes large charcoal and pastel drawings.

‘A child’s curiosity and fear of the adult world, religion and personal relationships. These have been my main themes – the familiar and the sensual; the familiar and the uncomfortable.’
(Sonia Boyce; ’The Thin Black Line’ catalogue.)

‘Being a black women is a perpetual struggle to be heard and appreciated as a human being. Many thoughts and fast fleeting images ran through me. I stretched my tiny arms to enfold the world but my embrace was inadequate. I put on political arms as an extension. Ideas burned, images continued to elude me.’
(Sonia Boyce; Extract from a conversation with Pitika Ntuli, AIR Gallery catalogue.)

‘Her main interest lies in depicting personal relationships and domestic situations – themes which might not be outwardly considered central to the black struggle. But precisely because her work does raise questions about the balance of power in relationships, about acceptable codes of behaviour and social taboos, it serves to subvert conventional norms.’
(AIR Gallery catalogue.)
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WOCI Reading Group Event 5

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Join us for the fifth Women of Colour Index Reading Group
Special Collections & Archives, The Library with Michelle Williams Gamaker, Althea Greenan and Samia Malik

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Special Collections, Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW

Event date: Monday 6th February 2017
Time: 10.30am – 1.00pm

Workshops reading text:

Artist; Samia Malik

Xtremist Supremacist
Following on from my research, reading groups and curatorial projects focusing on the WOCI (Women of Colour Index) at Women’s Art Library, I’m creating a series of artworks in response to WOCI called Xtremist Supremacist. One of the focal points of my art practice is to examine and dissemble patriarchal, consumer, imperialist structures.
Xtremist Supremacist presents artwork through the mediums of drawing and graphic slogans, discussing, decoding consumerist and imperialist structures. Exhibition also addresses – despite WOCI’s lack of visibility – artists and artwork in WOCI, in a sexist and racist art system, have carved a pavement for the most necessary integral antagonistic, stigmatic and objective discourse of imperialist colonial oppression.
Samia Malik

Exhibition on from 9/1/17 till 27/2/17
At: Kingsway Corridor, Richard Hoggart Building, Lewisham Way, New Cross, London SE14 6NW

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/join-us-for-the-fifth-women-of-colour-index-reading-group-tickets-31458345759?

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/364769393894719/

Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event 4

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Join us for the fourth Women of Colour Index Reading Group

Special Collections & Archives, The Library with Michelle Williams Gamaker, Althea Greenan, Samia Malik, and Rehana Zaman.

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Special Collections, Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW

Event date: Monday 16th January 2017
Time: 10.30am – 1.00pm
Workshops reading text:

Artist: Zarina Bhimji

In recent work, I have used photographs of personal objects to explore questions of identity and place. I want to create, communicate new meanings by bringing Indian language, objects, memory, dreams, conversations from East Africa and Indian backgrounds-as well as my experience of Western culture-to play in between two realities.

Travelling through London streets, I absorb the loudness of countless advertisements. Contradictions of text and image stimulate ideas for my own work. I collect sari patterns, wedding invitation cards, toys and jewellery as these objects tell stories of personal and cultural significance and to create metaphors for people, emotions and events.

When text is used, that is typed face, hand-script, size and texture, it is carefully considered as the image and treated as a vehicle through which meanings are suggested.

The issues in my work I attempt to deal with are ‘power’ and people who control to keep things as they are!
Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-event-4-tickets-30955114581

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1412021275488540/

WOC Index Workshop and Reading Group Event 3

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Join Michelle Williams Gamaker, Althea Greenan, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at 3rd Women of Colour Index reading group and workshop on:

Date: Monday 12th December 2017
Time: 10.30am – 1.00pm

At: Women’s Art Library, Special Collections Library
Goldsmiths University
New Cross
SE14 6NW
WORKHSOP READING TEXT:

ALONG THE LINES OF RESISTANCE
7th December 1988 – 22nd January 1989
Private View Friday 9th December 7.00-8.30pm

“Along the Lines of Resistance” brings together work by 20 women artists who have all been influenced by the critical framework of feminism in the 80s.

This stimulating show, selected from an open submission by exhibition organisers Sutapa Biswas, Sarah Edge, Claire Slattery, challenges the Post-modernist notion that feminism has been superseded. It demonstrates the diverse ways in which contemporary women’s art is involved with the major social and political concerns of our times.

The women artists represented here are looking inwards, chronicling their own struggles to sustain and project their identities within a culture beset by prejudice of gender, race class and sexuality. But they are also looking outwards, analysing their situation within the wider world. They examine the effects of warfare, imperialism, racism – violence both public and private. They report the destruction of environments, both natural and social. But they also draw attention to the means of resisting these pressures.

To date, political and critical art has tended to be shown in exhibitions that categorise and separates issues. This will be first major touring show that draws together the work of women from different cultural, social and political experiences.

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/woc-index-workshop-and-reading-group-event-3-tickets-29975797417

Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1871348466485067/

WOCI Workshop and Reading Group Event 2

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Join us for the second Women of Colour Index Reading Group

Monday 21st November 2016 at 11 – 1pm,
Special Collections & Archives, The Library with Althea Greenan, Samia Malik and Michelle Williams Gamaker

This month we will look at ‘the MEDIUM and the MESSAGE’, a seminal exhibition from 1988, featuring five women printmakers: Chila Kumari Burman, Trisha Ferguson, Alison Marchant, Julieta Rubio, Judith Rugg.

The Women of Colour Catalogue Reading Group has been initiated by artist Samia Malik and will run throughout the year. Its purpose is to make the archive an active space for learning, sharing and engaging with the work of women artists of colour who have made key contributions to contemporary art. Critical to this discussion is an exploration of how the archive is relevant to contemporary experiences of race, gender, sexuality, ability and class.
Everyone is welcome to join this conversation. Future sessions will explore ways to bring the archive to prominence at Goldsmiths and beyond.

Please note this session is open to all BA Fine Art Students including BA Fine Art Extension students.

About the Collection
The Women’s Art Library (MAKE) is located in the Library’s Special Collections Suite on the ground floor of the library. The Women’s Art Library began as an artists’ initiative that developed into an arts organization publishing catalogues and books as well as a magazine from the early 1980s to 2002. The main purpose however was to provide a place for women artists to deposit unique documentation of their work. Thousands of artists from around the world are represented in some form in this collection. The Women’s Art Library continues to collect slides, artist statements, exhibition ephemera, catalogues, and press material in addition to audio and videotapes, photographs and CD-Roms. We welcome donations from women artists to help us develop this collection.

WORKSHOP READING TEXTS:
*these texts will be provided during the workshop
the MEDIUM and the MESSAGE: 5 Women Printmakers (Chila Kumari Burman, Trisha Ferguson, Alison Marchant, Julieta Rubio, Judith Rugg) Rochdale Art Gallery, Jan-March, 1988
There Have Always Been Great Blackwomen Artists, Chila Burman
Ask how I feel: Chila Kumari Burman, Feminist Art News, issue #6

‘So all in all it was pretty hard. I think people under estimate the hard struggle that Asia working class women artists have to go through in order to assert themselves, gain respect, and survive in this mad world. To challenge the strict patriarchal culture with double standards and traditions which encourage suppression and control, demands courage and strength.’
Chila Kumari Burman, Feminist Art News, issue #6

It would seem that women’s traditional relationship with printmaking is a somehow ‘natural’ phenomenon. We would argue rather that women have become identified with this area because of the gender politics of art. Many factors influence women’s move into printmaking; the hierarchical relationship between sculpture, painting and printmaking, based on the former’s masculine credentials has forced women to move into such areas.
Their very presence has allowed society to construct negative associations, where printmaking is viewed as a craft; technical rather than creative, decorative rather than informative and aligned to the domestic.

The women in this exhibition consciously take on and disrupt such notions, their work deals with issues important to themselves and others.’
Sarah Edge, Jill Morgan, Rochdale Art Gallery, 1988

Ahead of the workshop, please read Chila Burman’s text:

THERE HAVE ALWAYS BEEN GREAT BLACKWOMEN ARTISTS (Synopsis) Chila Burman

We face many problems when trying to establish the very existence of Blackwomen’s art, and a strong social and political base from which to develop our study of it. Firstly, we have to struggle to establish our existence, let alone our credibility as autonomous beings, in the art world. Secondly, we can only remain that credible and survive as artists if we become fully conscious of ourselves, lest we are demoralised or weakened by the social, economic and political constraints which the white-male art establishment imposes and will continue to impose upon us.

This paper, then, is saying Blackwomen artists are here, we exist and we exist positively despite the racial, sexual and class oppressions which we suffer, but first however, we must point out the way in which these oppressions have operated in a wider context – not just in the art world, but also in the struggles for black and female liberation.

It is true to say that although Blackwomen have been the staunchest allies of black men and white women in the struggle of the oppression we all face at the hands of the capitalist and patriarchal system, we have hardly ever received either the support we need or recognition of our pivotal role in this struggle. Blackwomen now realise that because of the specific ways in which we are oppressed by white-male dominated society, we must present a new challenge to imperialism, racism and sexism from inside and outside the established black liberation movement and at critical distance to the white-dominated feminist movement. It is this realisation which has a lot to do with many second generation British Blackwomen reclaiming art, firstly as a legitimate area of activity for Blackwomen as a distinct group of people, secondly as a way of developing an awareness (denied us by this racist, sexist, class society) of ourselves as complete human beings and thirdly as a contribution to the black struggle in general.

Having said this, Blackwomen’s ability to do any of these three things is restricted by the same pressures of racism, sexism and class exclusivity which we experience in society in general. The bourgeoise art establishment only acknowledge white men as truly creative and innovative artists, whilst recognising art by white women only as a homogenous expression of femininity and art by black people (or, more accurately, within the terms of reference used, black men) as a static expression of the ritual experience of the daily lives of their communities, be they in the Third World or the imperialistic hinterland. In this system of knowledge Blackwomen artists, quiet simply, do not exist.

Eventbrite link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/wocc-workshop-and-reading-group-event-2-tickets-29073665115

Facebook event link: https://www.facebook.com/events/1585078531800332/