WOCI Reading Group looking at ‘Understanding Patriarchy’ by Bell Hooks with Who cares? A radio tale & Resonance 104.4 FM

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Patriarchy and ‘affective labour’- it is in the interests of white supremacist capitalist patriarchy that women of colour work is undervalued, lowest paid and ‘unskilled’ (so called) care roles; carers, nurses, cleaners, domestic workers professions are filled up by women of colour in our economy.

Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Who cares? A radio tale, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at Gasworks

Full address: Gasworks, 155 Vauxhall Street, London, SE11 5RH
Event Date: Sunday 13th May 2018
Time: 12.30pm – 1.30pm

Who cares? A radio tale turns Gasworks into a a live broadcast studio in collaboration with renowned experimental radio station Resonance 104.4 FM. A programme of newly commissioned and existing performances, sound works and discussions invites audiences to think about affective labour, the unrecognised emotional work that exists in all parts of life.

Tune in to Resonance 104.4fm or turn up at Gasworks and be present in the physical space of the gallery to observe all the hidden process of the programme’s second day of the live broadcast.

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome.

Workshop Reading Text:

‘Patriarchy is the single most life-threatening social disease assaulting the male body and spirit in our nation. Yet most men do not use the word “patriarchy” in everyday life. Most men never think about patriarchy – what it means, how it is created and sustained. Many men in our nation would not be able to spell the word or pronounce it correctly. The word “patriarchy” just is not part of their normal everyday thought or speech. Men who have heard and know the word usually associate with women’s liberation, with feminism, and therefore dismiss it as irrelevant to their own experiences. I have been standing at podiums talking about patriarchy for more than thirty years. It is a word I use daily, and men who hear me use it often ask me what I mean by it’. Understanding Patriarchy by Bell Hooks

Link to full text: http://imaginenoborders.org/pdf/zines/UnderstandingPatriarchy.pdf

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/woci-reading-group-looking-at-understanding-patriarchy-by-bell-hooks-with-who-cares-a-radio-tale-tickets-45806969880
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Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Dr Karen Salt

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What is the practice of justice in unjust spaces? A Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Dr Karen Salt

Join us for the next WOCI Reading Group with Dr Karen Salt, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at SOAS.

Full address: Room B204 (2nd Floor), Brunei Gallery, SOAS, University of London, Thornhaugh St, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG
Event Date: Wednesday 9th May 2018
Time: 17:00 – 19:00

This session will take up fragments of thought inspired by Alexis Pauline Gumbs’ recent work M Archive, a poetic text that responds to the work of Black Feminist theorist M. Jacqui Alexander and follows on from Spill: Scenes of Black Feminist Fugitivity (2016). These explorations will be accompanied by ‘readings’ of archive material from the Women of Colour Index on the work of Marlene Smith.

We begin by framing this quote by Gumbs

“what was in them that made work more food to them than food was? and tobacco? was it indigenous memory? how often did they paint their insides with substance and strain? is there an imprint that deepens in the face of repeated misunderstanding and tokenization? does it inoculate the blood?

what they found gave them pause. but they published a cursory article on ‘ego and the black artist’ to comply with the funding. and most of them moved on to other things. and didn’t tell each other that they never slept through the night again.”

[PLEASE NOTE WE WILL USE THE ABOVE QUOTE AS THE WORKSHOP READING TEXT)

Using Gumbs’ provocations and mullings as points to reflect and refract practice, justice, archives, work and memory, Salt works through questions of creativity and nullification. In disentangling issues of disavowal, activism and presence, Salt asks what ‘evidence’ do we produce for ourselves. In thinking about work, creativity and practice as an archive of evidence, Salt wonders if we have the necessary tools to work our way through the past—and the assemblages in our present—in order to construct just futures.

Bios:

Dr Karen Salt directs the Centre for Research in Race and Rights and leads Europe’s first-ever Black Studies PhD programme—both at the University of Nottingham. Salt is an expert on sovereignty, power, collective activism and systems of governance and collaborates on a number of research projects, including the Arts Council England project, The Bigger Picture. She is an active grant reviewer and recently began a 3-year appointment as a member of the Arts & Humanities Research Council Advisory Board where she advises on the development and implementation of strategic approaches to funding which reflect the challenges and opportunities arising for arts and humanities research and those that engage with it. She works with community organisations, activists and institutions on transformational social justice work and has focused quite a bit of her recent energies in thinking through the contours (and constraints) of inclusive practice(s). Her monograph, The Unfinished Revolution: Haiti, Black Sovereignty and Power in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World, will be published by Liverpool University Press in Autumn 2018. She has begun work on two new monographs: States of Blackness: Nationhood and Power in Haiti, Liberia and Abyssinia and Twilight Islands: Race and Politics in the Shadows of the Caribbean.

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome.

Facebook Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/436091586812919/

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-with-dr-karen-salt-tickets-45804998985

Join WOCI in exploring, activating and indexing representations of cultural identity within the Panchayat Special Collection at Tate with Shaheen Merali

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Join WOCI in exploring, activating and indexing representations of cultural identity within the Panchayat Special Collection at Tate with Shaheen Merali

Date: Friday 27th April 2018

Time: 10.30am – 1.00pm

Address: Tate Britain, Library & Archive Reading Rooms, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

The Women of Colour Index (WOCI) Reading Group aims to improve visibility for women of colour artists whilst using material in the library and archive to generate discussion and practice around current social and political concerns.

In these collaborative monthly research sessions at Tate, WOCI will draw upon the Panchayat Special Collection during its anniversary year; collectively exploring and highlighting the unique material within this vital collection of rare publications and exhibition ephemera from the 1980s.

About the Panchayat Special Collection
Panchayat was co-founded by Shaheen Merali and Allan de Souza in 1988, after consultation with artists Bhajan Hunjan, Symrath Patti, and Shanti Thomas. Panchayat was first organised by its co-founders as a project based arts organisation whose focus was to create an archive of works by contemporary artists who produced issue-based work, often in relation to developing and addressing plurality in multicultural environments. As Panchayat developed it was involved in publishing, curating exhibitions, programming conferences, and workshops.

The Panchayat Collection consists of documentation and reference library material relating to the cultural activities and activism predominantly in Britain, mainland Europe, North America and SE Asia between the 1980s and 2003. The Panchayat archive’s collecting strategy focused on the growing interactions within a globalising artworld of Black and Asian artists, as well documenting their commitment to the intersection between race, class, gender, policed sexualities, and (dis)ability. Dr Janice Cheddie and Shaheen Merali were keepers of the Panchayat Archive at the University of Westminster 2002 -2015 and remain central to its future development.

In May 2015 the contents of the collection were donated to the Tate Library as part of its Special Collection and since then has attracted researchers from both the arts and the humanities, including newer audiences that are interested in diasporic connections, Black and Asian British artists 1988- 2003, curatorial practices that emerged in the late eighties and in the role of women of colour in the visual arts and education.

All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome.

Reading Text:
Margaret Thatcher was quoted in Panorama programme ‘The Class Revolution’ as saying “We want our children to learn to add, subtract and not to learn anti-racist maths – whatever that may be.” The Prime Minister’s views legitimatised the claims of the media and the right wing educationists that anti-racist education “detracted from the real endeavours”. EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES IN THE ERA
Ann Marie Davies, Janet Holland, Rehana Minas. First published in March 1990.

Shaheen Merali is a curator and writer, currently based in London, who explores the intersection of art, cultural identity and global histories in his work. Previously, he was a key lecturer at Central Saint Martins School of Art (1995- 2003); a visiting lecturer and researcher at University of Westminster (1997- 2003) and the Head of Department of Exhibition, Film and New Media at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin (2003-2008) where he curated several exhibitions accompanied by publications, including The Black Atlantic; Dreams and Trauma- Moving images and the Promised Lands; and Re-Imagining Asia, One Thousand years of Separation.
Merali was the co-curator of the 6th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2006) and co-curator of Berlin Heist or the enduring fascination of walled cities for the 4th Mediations Biennale, Posnan, Poland (2014).
His recent exhibitions include Refractions, Moving Images on Palestine, P21 Gallery, London; WhenViolence becomes Decadent, ACC Galerie, Weimar; Speaking from the Heart– The Polemic Sensibility from Iran, Castrum Peregrini, Amsterdam and Fragile Hands- A curatorial essay on stated subjectivities, University of Applied Arts, Vienna. Masterclasses in 2015 include a series of talks on Globalisation at the London School of Contemporary Arts (LCCA) and Collaboration Strategies for the Amsterdam-based collective The State of L3. In 2017, the first of series of monographs edited by Merali has been released by Isolated Labs (Tavares Strachan) and forthcoming release by Carrots Publishing (JJ XI).
His essays have been included in recent publications including, Conflict And Compassion: A Paradox of difference in Contemporary Asian Art Edited by Bashir Makhoul and Alnoor Mitha, HOME Manchester, 2016; The Live Art Almanac Volume Edited by Harriet Curtis, Lois Keidan and Aaron Wright, Oberon Books London; Contemporary Art from the Middle East, Edited by Hamid Keshmirshekan, IB Tauris, 2015; Dissonant Archives, Contemporary Visual Culture and Contested Narratives in the Middle East, Edited by Anthony Downey, I.B.Tauris, 2015; In FLUX, Contemporary Art from Asia, Edited by P.D.Mukherji, N.P.Ahuja, K.Singh, Sage Publications, 2013 and Public Notice 3: Jitish Kallat at the Art Institute of Chicago,ed. by Madhuvanti Ghose. Chicago: The Art Institute of Chicago and Yale University Press, 2011.
museumofnonvisibleart.com/interviews/shaheen-merali/‎
Curated exhibition: Re-Imagining Asiahttps://universes.art/specials/2008/re-asia/

About the WOCI Reading Group
The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. WOCI sessions have focused on seminal exhibitions such as Testimony: Three Black Women Photographers (1986) and The Image Employed: the Use of Narrative in Black art (1987), and artists such as Zarina Bhimji, Martina Attile, Jagjit Chuhan, Sharon Curtis, Nina Edge, Maxine Walker, Sutapa Biswas, Sonia Boyce and Chila Kumari Burman.

WOCI follow keenly in the footsteps of Rita Keegan who compiled the index and Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski, Lauren Craig, Mystique Holloway, Gina Nembhard and Zhi Holloway, who as the formidable art and art research collective X Marks the Spot (XMTS), took WOCI as the focus for their residency at the Women’s Art Library in 2012 culminating in the publication Human Endeavour.

To book tickets please visit Tate Webpage: http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-britain/talk/women-colour-index-reading-group

 

 

Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski

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Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at the Women’s Art Library.

Full address: Women’s Art Library, Goldsmiths, University of London, New Cross SE14 6NW
Event Date: Thursday 1st March 2018
Time: 3pm – 4.30pm

Bio: Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski

Ego Ahaiwe Sowinski Minneapolis based, London-born, Nigerian mixed-media artist/designer, archivist and organiser. Her work and research explores the relationship between feminist, queer, decolonizing theories/spaces and organizational, curatorial, artistic (self) archiving practices.

Sowinski is currently part of the Archival Education Research Initiative (AERI) Emerging Archival Scholars Program (EASP). Between 2014-16 she was an artist/archivist in residence at the Women’s Art Library, Goldsmiths with art, archival research group X Marks the Spot. Sowinski is currently collaborating with artist/archivist Rita Keegan and the Women of Colour Index Artist Files Collection.  She is in the process of developing a collaborative digitisation project to archive the papers of Nigerian Afrobeat musician, Fela Anikulapo Kuti (1938-1997).  She is a committee member for the GLC Story Oral History Project and a specialist volunteer for the Equiano Centre, UCL.

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome

Workshop reading text:

‘WHAT IS PEOPLE’S REACTION TO YOUR WORK?
Not many people stop too much. A lot of people just pass over them. Black and white. I would like people to look at them a bit more carefully and think about them.

There’s a lot of discussion about art, but photography’s such a young a medium. There’s a big block even though there’s stuff coming out now. You need to actually compile bibliographies and stuff so that a dialogue can happen’. Ingrid Pollard talks to Molly Shinhat. Polareyes – A journal about Black Women working in photography, Issue No.1 1987.
Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-with-ego-ahaiwe-sowinski-tickets-43324042377
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Women of Colour Index Reading Group on artist Georgina Grant as part of The Open Field Residency 

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Women of Colour Index Reading Group on artist Georgina Grant as part of The Open Field Residency

Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at Open Field Studio.

*Closed event (only open to student and staff at CASS).
Event Date: Monday 26th February 2018
Time: 4pm – 6pm
Address: Open Field Studio, The CASS, 3rd Floor, Calcutta Annex, Old Castle St, London E1

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome.

Workshop reading text:

‘The self portraits within this exhibition relate my feelings and emotions at different periods of my life. Although painted at college they exist separately from other work I did at that time. They represent a release of emotion, they were more personal than my work, with them I could relax and look at myself.

My mixed parentage is an underlying force in some of my paintings, but mainly these are about being a Black woman within an environment where all the ‘models’ – students, tutors and ‘Old Masters’ are white.

I feel that Black women artists are making statements from all different angles, personal and otherwise, ultimately reaching points of discovery to do with Black identity and women’s identity, but mainly they do not see these two identities as separate’. Georgina Grant, May 1988.
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The ‘R’ Words – Racism and Reparations: Women of Colour speaking out loud in a culture of silencing and co-option   

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Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event with Decolonising Our Minds Society

Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Halimo Hussain, Carol John, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at SOAS.

Full address: Room: 116, Russell Square Campus, SOAS University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London, WC1H 0XG
Event Date: Wednesday 17th January 2018
Time: 5pm – 7pm

Decolonising Our Minds Society Bio
London based society committed to deconstructing the legacies of colonialism responsible for structural and epistemic violence.

Carol John – works in Student Advice and Wellbeing and is the UCU rep for Equality and Diversity. She is also involved in community organising outside of the university and Halimo Hussein – The Student Union Co-President (Equality and Liberation).  Halimo is one of the original members of the Decolonising Our Minds Society but also involved in organising outside of the university. She currently sits on the Decolonising SOAS working group.

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome

 

Workshop reading text:

‘The smile of diversity is a fantasy fold. Diversity is often imagined as a form of repair a way of mending or fixing histories of being broken. Indeed, diversity enters institutional discourse as a language of reparation; as a way of imagining that those who are divided can work together; as a way of assuming that “to get along” is to right a wrong. Not to be excluded becomes not simply an account of the present (an account of becoming included) but also a way of relating to the past. Racism is framed as a memory of what is no longer, a memory if it was kept alive would just leave us exhausted. Fanon once commented very wisely how slavery had become “that unpleasant memory” ([1952] 1986: 115). It is almost as if it would be impolite to bring it up. In the book Life in the United Kingdom, on which British citizenship tests are based, there is one reference to slavery and that is to abolitionism (Home Office 2005: 13). The nation is remembered as the liberator of slaves, not as the perpetrator of slavery’.

On Being Included: Racism and Diversity in Institutional Life by Sara Ahmed

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-r-words-racism-and-reparations-women-of-colour-speaking-out-loud-in-a-culture-of-silencing-and-tickets-42050900375

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Women of Colour Index Reading Group Event with Alia Pathan

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Join us for the next Women of Colour Index Reading Group with Alia Pathan, Michelle Williams Gamaker, Samia Malik and Rehana Zaman at ASC Gallery exhibiting Alia Pathan’s solo show ‘Fire Rooster’.

Full address: ASC, Gallery, The Chaplin Centre, Taplow House, Thurlow St, London SE17 2DG
Event Date: Monday 18th December 2017
Time: 5pm – 7pm

The Women of Colour Index Reading Group was set up in October 2016 by artists, Samia Malik, Michelle Williams Gamaker and Rehana Zaman. The reading group meets on a monthly basis to discuss work within the Women of Colour Index (WOCI); a unique collection of slides and papers collated by artist Rita Keegan that chart the emergence of Women of Colour artists during the ‘critical decades’ of the 1980s and 1990s. Reading group sessions aim to improve the visibility of women of colour artists whilst using material in the archive to generate discussion, thought and practice around current social and political concerns. All people of all backgrounds, genders, sexualities, religions and race are welcome

 

Workshop reading text:

“AP As you walk into the show there’s 3 sound pieces from the White Tiger Project, a research project I started the beginning of this year, looking at second and third generation descendants of East African Indian indentured labourers, that came from India to East Africa which is the same as my heritage. I will at some point open that out to people who left East Africa at the same time (while it was under British colonial rule) and moved to other countries within Africa. But for the moment this archive is focusing on descendants who live in England because for these people they are often 80 – 100 years removed from their ethnic heritage. And the stories are focused on what their lives are like whether they can remember anything or their histories are cut off from them. For them it’s about creating a sense of home and identity for themselves. For example one of the participants says when people ask her where she is from she can’t answer truthfully about her provenance. There seems to be an insistence on provenance especially within contemporary art and in political discussions today…. And if you’re a diaspora… it feels untrue to call one place your home. That’s why this archive opens the show, and instead of a press release – their stories create my context when there isn’t already a context written for me”

Katharine Fry interview with Alia Pathan, Fire Rooster PV, ASC Gallery 17 November 2017, Press Release

Photo credit to Eleni Parousi

Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-of-colour-index-reading-group-event-with-alia-pathan-tickets-41119511566

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